Clarifying Multimorbidity Patterns to Improve Targeting and Delivery of Clinical Services for Medicaid Populations

Authors
Cynthia Boyd
Bruce Leff
Carlos Weiss
Jennifer Wolff
Allison Hamblin
Lorie Martin
Brief/Report
December 2010

To inform the delivery of targeted care for the highest-need beneficiaries, this resource examines comorbidity patterns among Medicaid beneficiaries under 65 years old with disabilities. Key findings include:

  • Among this population, people who have the highest hospitalization rates and receive the most avoidable, costly care also frequently have multiple conditions.
  • For beneficiaries with one of five common chronic physical conditions — asthma/chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, congestive heart failure, coronary heart disease, diabetes, or hypertension — the presence of mental illness as well as drug and alcohol disorders significantly increases per capita costs and number of hospitalizations.
  • Beneficiaries who have a mental illness in addition to common chronic physical conditions have health care costs that are 60 to 75 percent higher than those without a mental illness.
  • Evidence-based models for addressing multimorbidity share common elements that can inform Medicaid care management approaches.
  • Greater integration and care management strategies are needed to meet the needs of beneficiaries with multiple conditions.
Posted to The Playbook on
Level of Evidence
Moderate
What does this mean?